Distinguished Research Professor
Adjunct Professor of International Affairs
Adjunct Professor of Anthropology
Director, UGA à Paris Study Abroad Program

Contact info

Office:
Geog-Geol Bldg, 210 Field Street, Athens, Georgia 30602, 209
Office Hours:
By Appointment.
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I am a human geographer and political economist interested in how the economic geography of capitalism is made.  Within that broad description, I have been particularly focused upon exploring how working people play active roles in shaping economic landscapes under capitalism and how, in turn, the physical and ideological form of the landscape can sometimes enable and sometimes constrain the possibilities for working people’s actions – that is to say, I am interested in the ways in which working people make their own geographies but not under the conditions of their own choosing.  It is this approach to understanding working people’s spatiality – what I have termed “Labor Geography” – upon which I have focused much of my research for the past 25 years or so.  My research has involved such diverse topics as: how US east coast dockers struggled to control the location of work once technological innovations like containerization began to affect their industry in the 1950s; how dockers also went about building new geographical scales of organizing in response to the growing national spatial integration of the cargo-handling industry; how autoworkers were able to bring General Motors’s operations to a grinding halt in the late 1990s by striking at several strategic choke points in the corporation’s structure; how Western unions went about working with unions in Central and Eastern Europe in the 1990s to help rebuild the labor movement there after the collapse of Communism; the role played by the US labor movement in fighting Communism in Latin America and the Caribbean, and what this meant for the subsequent globalization of US capital; and the challenges faced by precarious workers in industries such as cleaning and how they are fighting to resist the pressures being brought to bear upon them by neoliberal capitalism.

A second, though related, area of my scholarship has been on the topic of what has come to be termed “globalization.”  Globalization is many things – an economic process, a political process, a cultural process, and a historical process.  But it is also a fundamentally geographical process, as different parts of the planet are connected together – and sometimes disconnected – in new and different ways than they were in the past.  Importantly, this connecting of places geographically also plays out in a historically uneven manner.  My main goal, then, has been to understand globalization as a historical-geographical process, both materially and also ideologically (i.e., how do we think about globalization and how do the ways in which we think about it shape what we believe is happening in the global economy and therefore what might be possible politically?).  Within this broad goal I have been particularly interested in articulating how working people have played active roles in promoting globalization in some times and places and in resisting it in others, with both activities playing profound roles in shaping how the contemporary global economy functions.  What I suggest is that the creation of new linkages between different places and the rescaling of contemporary economic, political, and social life (what we call "globalization") do not come about solely through the actions of collective capital but, rather, are the result of deeply contested processes, ones in which workers have played – and continue to play – fundamental roles.  Recognizing this means that we can collectively imagine different futures for our planet and different versions of “globalization” (such as proletarian internationalization) rather than simply accepting a neoliberal version of what globalization is.

More recently, along with colleagues Al Rainnie, Susan McGrath-Champ (University of Sydney), and Graham Pickren (Roosevelt University), I have written on the topic of Global Production Networks (GPNs), especially on the role played by workers in shaping these networks’ organizational (and thus spatial) structures.  Extending our interest in how commodities are put together and how the contested labor process shapes the manner in which this occurs, we also have explored how they are taken apart in other types of networks – what we are calling Global Destruction Networks (GDNs) – as their constituent elements (like precious metals, plastics, and so forth) are extracted for possible re-use as inputs into new GPNs.  As with our work on GPNs, so does our work on GDNs detail how workers' activities and the ways in which the labor process is organized shape these networks’ structures.  Through this work we have sought to insert a focus upon labor into the so-called “circular economy” literature.

Many of my publications can be found on line here: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Andrew_Herod/contributions

I would be interested in supervising graduate students with interests in any of these areas, as well as with interests in issues of labor and political economy more generally.

In terms of teaching, at the undergraduate level I regularly teach the “Human Geography: People, Places, and Cultures” (GEOG 1101) course.  This focuses upon a number of topics, including: what it means to "think geographically"; critical perspectives on cartography as a mode of representing the world; demographic structure and change in various parts of the world and their connection to processes of economic development; and how 19th and 20th century imperialism have shaped patterns of global development in ways that still affect the lives of the planet’s inhabitants today.   I also teach the “Globalization and the Making of the Modern World” (GEOG 3620) course.  This focuses upon three key issues: i) how do the ways in which we conceptualize globalization shape what we think is happening in the global economy (is the state becoming weaker in the face of global capital, for instance, or is it simply functioning in different ways than before?)?; ii) how did European and US imperialism in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries serve as a “first round” of globalization and with what effects?; iii) how are transnational corporations connecting the planet together in new and different ways as part of a “second round” of globalization?  A third undergraduate class that I teach – though only on the UGA à Paris Study Abroad Program in Paris – is the cross-listed course “Paris and Modernity: Power, Politics, and Identity in the City” (GEOG/ INTL/ HIST 4634).  This course focuses upon: France’s rise as a global power (especially the creation of the first and second empires in the 18th and 19th centuries and the French government’s efforts to present itself as a Muslim power during its 19th century conquest of North and West Africa); the rebuilding of Paris from the late 18th century to the early 20th century as Paris was reimagined as a grand capital city fit for an empire and home to the principles of modernist rationalism (this section of the class looks at how the city was physically redesigned and rebuilt to allow the ruling elites to exercise political power over Parisian society and how, in turn, this urban form was resisted); and, finally, what it means to “be French” today in the context of France being a multi-cultural society (thanks to its imperial legacy) and the growing efforts of the European Union to encourage people to abandon national identities and to create post-national ones – i.e., to get people to think of themselves not as French or German or Italian but as “European.”

At the graduate level I regularly teach a variety of courses which all focus, in different ways, upon questions of political economy.  These include: “Labor, Class and Politics” (INTL/GEOG 8355), which explores the nature of work, workers, and labor representation in advanced capitalist societies; and “Seminar in Economic Geography” (GEOG 8620), which focuses upon various topics concerning how we think about "the economic" as a field of investigation and how various economic actors (the state, global capital, labor) interact with one another to shape how the contemporary capitalist economy functions.  I have also taught the “Seminar in Social Theory in Geography” (GEOG 8920), which I created in the mid-1990s and within which I have covered various topics (such as a seminar exploring debates around questions of globalization, a seminar on reading Capital, and a seminar looking at society-nature relations, amongst others).  Finally, for over two decades I was responsible for the “Seminar in Geographic Thoughts and Methods” (GEOG 8910), which I taught as a philosophy of science/ history of geographic thought class and in which we explored questions concerning how the ways in which we think about the world epistemologically shapes how we understand it and can make claims about it through the practice of “science” (it was, in other words, a class in which we thought about how we think about the world and the various natural and social processes shaping it).

Lastly, since 2004 I have directed the UGA à Paris Study Abroad Program.  This is a six-week program in which students can take 6 credit hours towards their undergraduate degrees whilst spending time in the city that Walter Benjamin called “the capital of the 19th century” and that Gertrude Stein claimed was “where the 20th century was.”  We also spend time in Normandy and Brittany and in the Loire Valley.  We accept both UGA and non-UGA students.

Education:

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY 1988-1992, New Brunswick, NJ.  Ph.D. in Geography (4.0 GPA).  Dissertation title: “Towards a Labor Geography: The Production of Space and the Politics of Scale in the East Coast Longshore Industry, 1953-1990” (440 pages).

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 1986-1988, Morgantown, WV.  Master of Arts in Geography (4.0 GPA).  Thesis title: “Industrial Reorganization and the Local Response to Plant Closures: A New Politics of Manufacturing Decline” (118 pages).

UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL 1983-1986, Bristol, England.  Bachelor of Social Science in Geography (First Class Honours); subsidiary subject Sociology (Distinction).

Of note:

VISITING APPOINTMENTS:

2015  Visiting Professor, Hellenic Open University, Athens, Greece.  Funded by the Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board, Fulbright Specialist Program, Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES), Institute of International Education (IIE), United States Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Washington, DC.

2005  Visiting Distinguished Professor, Work and Organisational Studies, School of Business, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Sydney, Australia.

2002  Hilary Term Scholar in Residence, UGA at Oxford Program, Keble College, Oxford, England.

 

AWARDS AND HONORS:

2017    Invited to present a Keynote Address to the 2017 Alumni Seminar on “A Sense of Place,” University of Georgia, February 17-18: “The Nature of Place in a Globalizing World.”

2013    My article “Dockers and seafarers: What the politics of spatial embeddedness and geographical scale have meant for union organizing in the European maritime trades,” written with Leah Carmichael, that appeared in Labor Studies Journal (2012) 37.2: 203-227, was awarded “Best Article from Volume 37” by the Labor Studies Journal Editorial Board.

2012    Invited to present the Keynote Address to the 2012 Academic Affairs Faculty Symposium of the University of Georgia, Unicoi Conference Center, March 23-24: “The Teaching/Research Nexus: How Disciplinary Research Can Enhance the Quality of Teaching and Learning and How Teaching Can Motivate and Engage Research Faculty.”

2012    The 2012 Office of International Education Study Abroad Award for making “major contributions to the study abroad effort at the University of Georgia by working directly with a study abroad program and/or contributing to the infrastructure that advances UGA’s overall study abroad effort” through developing and directing the UGA à Paris Study Abroad program, helping “identify and work with bureaucratic hurdles faced by study abroad directors…serv[ing] on numerous OIE committees and…advis[ing] and mentor[ing] several UGA study abroad directors.”

2011    The Harold and Florence Mayer Lecturer, Department of Geography, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, WI: “Labor union organizing strategies in early 21st century USA.”

2009    William A. Owens Creative Research Award.

Awarded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation in recognition of outstanding research in the social and behavioral sciences.  One award is made per year.  "The William A. Owens Award is given to recognize an outstanding body of nationally and internationally recognized scholarly or creative activities in the social and behavioral sciences” (Nominating guidelines)

2009    My article “Local political practice in response to a manufacturing plant closure: How geography complicates class analysis,” published in Antipode (1991; 23.4, 385-402), was listed by the journal’s publisher as one of the 40-most influential articles published in Antipode between 1969 and 2009.

2008    The 2008 Outstanding Research Honors Award, Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers.

Awarded by the Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers Honors Committee for exceptional research.  One award is made per year.  “Nominees for this award should meet the following criteria: (1) A significant record of quality research and publication in scholarly journals, books, and other appropriate formats.  This record may reflect the cumulative work of several years or the publication of important contributions in a shorter period of time: (2) Evidence of research leadership at both an institutional (college, university, industry) and organizational level (professional associations) where scholarly papers are presented and students and colleagues are advised” (Nominating guidelines)

2001    American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE) Imogene Okes Research Award.

Awarded for the best article published during 2000 in the field of adult and continuing education [Ben Salt, Ron Cervero, and Andrew Herod (2000): “Workers’ education and neoliberal globalization: An adequate response to transnational corporations?”  Adult Education Quarterly 51.1: 9-31.]  “AAACE’s Commission of Research sponsors the Imogene Okes Research Award to recognize persons whose research contributes significantly to the advancement of adult and continuing education.  Begun in 1976 under the auspices of the AEA-USA, the award has been given [on a periodic basis] to…individuals on the basis of their published work” (Commission of Professors of Adult Education guidelines).

2001    Creative Research Medal, University of Georgia Research Foundation.

“The Creative Research Medal is awarded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation as a recognition of outstanding accomplishment in research and creativity for a research project or creative activity with a single coherent theme.  Faculty at the University of Georgia are nominated for the Creative Research Medal by their colleagues and chosen by a committee of distinguished faculty representing both the humanities and sciences.  Each year individuals who have carried out a research project or creative endeavor of truly outstanding quality are honored this way” (Creative Research Medal guidelines, UGA Research Foundation).

2000    National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE) Journal of Geography Awards Task Force Best Content Award.

Awarded for the best article published during 1999 in Journal of Geography (Andrew Herod “Using industrial disputes to teach about economic geography,” Journal of Geography 98.5: 229-241).

1999    My book Organizing the Landscape: Geographical Perspectives on Labor Unionism (University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis and London, 1998) was designated a “Breakthrough Book” by Lingua Franca May/ June 1999, p. 16-17 (Lingua Franca was the academic magazine about intellectual life which the New York Times [10/18/01] once called “a must-read for intellectuals”).  The book was recognized for providing a “more nuanced understanding of how labor struggles and agreements contribute to the transformation of specific landscapes.”

1996    Royal Geographical Society/ Institute of British Geographers Young Research Worker.  Invited address to the Economic Geography Study Group, Annual Conference of the Royal Geographical Society/ Institute of British Geographers, Glasgow, Scotland, January 3-6.

1994    J. Warren Nystrom Award for the best Ph.D. dissertation in Geography 1992-93, Association of American Geographers.

1993    The M.G. Michael Award, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, University of Georgia for excellence in research.  (One award made in competition open to all faculty ranks throughout the College.)

“The M.G. Michael Award was established in 1944 to stimulate new initiatives in scholarship in all areas of the Arts and Sciences.  Its primary purpose is to encourage the development of a new (and perhaps adventurous) idea or project during the coming year.  The Award implies faith in that purpose and in the ability of the faculty member selected to plan and conduct the proposed research; it is not given in recognition of previous research accomplishments.  Nevertheless, it does require evidence that recipients have been proficient researchers” (Franklin College of Arts and Sciences award guidelines).

1993    Best Ph.D. Dissertation 1991-92, Industrial Geography Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers.

1992    Best Graduate Student Paper, Political Geography Specialty Group, Annual Conference of the Association of American Geographers, San Diego, CA, April 18-22.

1991    Best Graduate Student Paper, Conference of the Middle States Division of the Association of American Geographers, State College, PA, October 4-6.

1988    Prize, Appalachian Studies Conference Student Essay Competition, Radford VA, March 18-20.

 

BIOGRAPHIES/ PROFILES:

2015    Interview with Dr. Juscelino Eudâmidas Bezerra (Departamento de Geografia da UNB e Professor Colaborador do Programa de Pós-graduação em Geografia da Universidade Estadual Ceará-UECE).  Citation is: Bezerra, J.E. “Entrevista ao Professor Dr. Andrew Herod”, Revista GeoUECE: Programa de Pós-Graduação em Geografia da UECE Fortaleza/CE, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 175-191, Jan./Jun. 2015.

2010    Research and public service featured in the “Back Page” feature of the Georgia Magazine, September Issue (vol. 89, no. 4), p. 56 (published by the Office of Public Affairs, University of Georgia).

2009    Research and public service featured in spread in UGA Research Magazine, October Issue, pp. 20-25 (published by the Office of the Vice President for Research, University of Georgia).

2008    Research on globalization (with photo spread) featured in Exploring Nationalism by Robert Gardner, Margaret Hoogeveen, Daniel McDevitt, and Angus Scully, p 269 (McGraw-Hill Ryerson: Toronto).  Exploring Nationalism was created specifically for the Alberta Social Studies 20-1 Program of Study but is used across Canada in Grade 10 high school, including in a French-language version.

2004    “Andrew Herod: Questions of class and geographies of labour.”  A biography written by Ruth Panelli in Social Geographies: From Difference to Action, pp. 220-222 (Sage: London).

 

OTHER:

Member, Complete Count Committee for the 2020 Census.  Appointed by Executive Order of the Honorable Nathan Deal, 82nd Governor of the State of Georgia, to ensure an accurate enumeration of the population of Georgia in the census undertaken on April 1, 2020.

 

Selected Publications:

Books – Authored:

2018    Andrew Herod: Labor.  Polity Press “Geopolitics of Resources” series: Cambridge, UK.

 

2015    Stelios Gialis and Andrew Herod: Γεωγραφία της Eργασίας: Eργατική Δράση, Eυέλικτη Aπασχόληση Kαι Xωρικές Aνισότητες (Geografia tis Ergasias: Ergatiki Drasi, Evelikti Apasxolisi Kai Xorikes Anisotites – Labor Geography: Labor Agency, Flexible Employment and Spatial Inequalities).  Kallipos publishing initiative, Hellenic Academic Libraries: Athens, Greece.  This e-book is the first Greek-language monograph within the thematic area of Labor Geography.  It is used throughout the Greek higher education system.

 

2010    Andrew Herod: Scale.  “Key Ideas in Geography” Series.  Routledge: London.

 

2009    Andrew Herod: Geographies of Globalization: A Critical Introduction.  Critical Introductions to Geography Series.  Wiley-Blackwell: Chichester, UK.

 

2001    Andrew Herod: Labor Geographies: Workers and the Landscapes of Capitalism. Guilford Press: New York (“Perspectives on Economic Change” Series).

 

Books – Edited:

2016    Rob Lambert and Andrew Herod (editors): Neoliberal Capitalism and Precarious Work: Ethnographies of Accommodation and Resistance.  Edward Elgar: Cheltenham, UK.

 

2010    Susan McGrath-Champ, Andrew Herod, and Al Rainnie (editors): Handbook of Employment and Society: Working Space.  Edward Elgar: Cheltenham, UK. 

 

2006    Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod (editors): The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy.  Blackwell: Oxford.  

 

2002    Andrew Herod and Melissa W. Wright (editors): Geographies of Power: Placing Scale.  Blackwell: Oxford.

 

 

1998    Andrew Herod (editor):  Organizing the Landscape: Geographical Perspectives on Labor Unionism.  University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis and London.  

 

1998    Andrew Herod, Gearóid Ó Tuathail, and Susan Roberts (editors): An Unruly World? Globalization, Governance and Geography.  Routledge: London and New York.

 

Special Issues of Journals Edited:

2012    Lisa Fine and Andrew Herod, Special issue on “Working Space: An Interdisciplinary Conversation about Geographical Consciousness in Labor and Working-Class Scholarship,” Labor History, 53.3: 329-434.

2006    Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod, Special issue on “The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy,” Antipode, 38.3: 425-666. (Issue published simultaneously as Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod (eds.) The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy.  Blackwell: Oxford).

2001    Andrew Herod and Melissa W. Wright, Special issue on “Theorizing Space and Time,” Environment and Planning A, 33.12: 2089-2093.

 

Refereed Journal Articles:

2017    Andrew Herod: “Workers as geographical actors.”  Revista Pegada (Brazil) 18.2: 4-30.  (This is a somewhat reworked version of a paper originally published in the journal Labor History 53.3: 335-353, 2012).

2016    Andrew Herod: “Labor’s spatial praxis and the economic geography of the Greek crisis.”  ΓΕΩΓΡΑΦΙΕΣ: ΕΞAMHNIAIA EKΔOΣH EΠIΣTHMΩN TOY XΩPOY (GEOGRAPHIES: A BIANNUAL REVIEW OF SPATIAL ISSUES) 28: 12-23.  [Special issue on “Greece, Southern Europe and the Crisis.”]

2015    Susan McGrath-Champ, Al Rainnie, Graham Pickren, and Andrew Herod: “Global Destruction Networks, the labour process and employment relations.”  Journal of Industrial Relations 57.4: 624-640.  [Special issue on “Supply Chains, HRM and Labour Standards.”]

2014    Stelios Gialis and Andrew Herod: “Of steel and strawberries: Greek workers struggle against informal and flexible working arrangements during the crisis.”  Geoforum 57: 138-149.

2014    Stelios Gialis, Andrew Herod, and Myron Myridis: “Flexicurity, informality and immigration: The insufficiency of the Southern EU framework, as illustrated through the case of Preveza, Greece.”  Journal of Modern Greek Studies 32.1: 25-54.  [The Journal of Modern Greek Studies is the official publication of the Modern Greek Studies Association.]

2014    Andrew Herod: “O conhecimento geográfico sobre os trabalhadores: Reflexões sobre as pesquisas nos Estados Unidos e Brasil.” [“Geographical scholarship on workers: Reflections on the field in the United States and Brazil”].  Revista Pagada Vol. 15 – Número Especial, Mai 2014, page 5-47.  Online version available at: http://revista.fct.unesp.br/index.php/pegada/issue/view/218/showToc.  [Published simultaneously in Portuguese and in English.]

2014    Andrew Herod, Graham Pickren, Al Rainnie, and Susan McGrath-Champ: “Global Destruction Networks, labour, and waste.”  Journal of Economic Geography 14.2: 421-441.

2013    Andrew Herod: “Gewerkschaften globalisieren?” [“Trade union globalization?”]  LuXemburg: Gesellschaftsanalyse und linke Praxis [LuXemburg: Critical Social Analysis and Left Praxis] 3.4: 108-115.  [In German.]

2013    Andrew Herod, Graham Pickren, Al Rainnie, and Susan McGrath-Champ: “Waste, commodity fetishism and the ongoingness of economic life.”  Area 45.3: 376-382.

2013    Stelios Gialis and Andrew Herod: “Resisting austerity: The case of Greece’s powerworkers and steelworkers.”  Human Geography 6.2: 98-115.

2013    Al Rainnie, Andrew Herod, and Susan McGrath-Champ: “Global production networks, labour and small firms.”  Capital and Class 37.2: 177-195.

2012    Lisa Fine and Andrew Herod: “Working space: An interdisciplinary conversation about geographical consciousness in labor and working-class scholarship.”  Labor History 53.3: 329-333.  (Introduction to special issue on “Working Space: An Interdisciplinary Conversation about Geographical Consciousness in Labor and Working-Class Scholarship”).

2012    Andrew Herod: “Workers as geographical actors.”  Labor History 53.3: 335-353.

2012    Leah Carmichael and Andrew Herod: “Dockers and seafarers: What the politics of spatial embeddedness and geographical scale have meant for union organizing in the European maritime trades.”  Labor Studies Journal 37.2: 203-227. (Awarded “Best Article from Volume 37” by the Labor Studies Journal Editorial Board).

2012    Andrew Herod: “On the transparency and opacity of the economic landscape.”  Labor History 53.2: 283-288.  Part of a Symposium on the book Grounding Globalization: Labour in the Age of Insecurity by Andries Bezuidenhout, Edward Webster, and Rob Lambert (2008, Wiley-Blackwell), Labor History 53.2: 279-284.

2011    Andrew Herod: “What does the 2011 Japanese tsunami tell us about the nature of the global economy?”  Social & Cultural Geography 12.8: 829-837.

2011    Al Rainnie, Andrew Herod, and Susan McGrath-Champ: “Review and positions: Global production networks and labour.”  Competition and Change 15.2: 155-169.

2011    Nik Heynen, Peter Hossler, and Andrew Herod: “Surviving uneven development: Social reproduction and the persistence of capitalism.”  New Political Economy 16.2: 239-245.

2007    Andrew Herod, Al Rainnie, and Susan McGrath-Champ: “Working space: Why incorporating the geographical is central to theorizing work and employment practices.”  Work, Employment and Society 21.2: 247-264. 

Reprinted in Marian Baird, Rae Cooper, Bradon Ellem, and Russell Lansbury (eds.) (2011), Industrial Relations: Major Works – Volume I, Theories and Approaches, pp. 301-318.  Sage: London.

2007    Al Rainnie, Andrew Herod, and Susan McGrath-Champ: “Spatialising industrial relations.”  Industrial Relations Journal (Britain) 38.2: 102-118.

2006    Andrew Herod and Luis L.M. Aguiar: “Cleaners and the dirty work of neoliberalism.  Antipode 38.3: 425-434.  (Introduction to special issue on “The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy”).

2006    Andrew Herod and Luis L.M. Aguiar: “Section I Introduction: Geographies of neoliberalism.”  Antipode 38.3: 435-439.

2006    Shaun Ryan and Andrew Herod: “Restructuring the architecture of state regulation in the Australian and Aotearoa/ New Zealand cleaning industries and the growth of precarious employment.”  Antipode 38.3: 486-507.

2006    Andrew Herod and Luis L.M. Aguiar: “Section II Introduction: Ethnographies of the cleaning body.”  Antipode 38.3: 530-533.

2006    Karen Søgaard, Anne Katrine Blangsted, Andrew Herod, and Lotte Finsen: “Work design and the labouring body: Examining the impacts of work organisation on Danish cleaners’ health.”  Antipode 38.3: 579-602.

2006    Andrew Herod and Luis L.M. Aguiar: “Section III Introduction: Cleaners’ agency.”  Antipode 38.3: 603-607.

2006    Andrew Herod: “Labour, space and capitalist restructuring.”  Labor History 47.1: 102-108.  Part of a Symposium on the book Global Restructuring and the Power of Labour by Bill Dunn (2004, Macmillan), Labor History 47.1: 95-126.

2004    Andrew Herod: “The impact of containerization on work on the New York-New Jersey waterfront.”  Social Science Docket, 4.1 (Winter-Spring): 5-7.  [Special issue on “Work and Workers in New Jersey and New York.”]

Reprinted in William G. Moseley, David A. Lanegran, and Kavita Pandit (eds.) (2007), The Introductory Reader in Human Geography: Contemporary Debates and Classic Writings, pp. 306-309.  Blackwell: Oxford.

2003    Andrew Herod: “Geographies of labor internationalism.”  Social Science History, 27.4: 501-523.  [Special issue on “Labor Internationalism.”].

2003    Andrew Herod: “Workers, space, and labor geography.”  International Labor and Working-Class History, no. 64 (Fall): 112-138.  [Special issue on “Workers, Suburbs, and Labor Geography.”]

2002    Andrew Herod: “Towards a more productive engagement: Industrial relations and economic geography meet.”  Labour and Industry: A Journal of the Social and Economic Relations of Work, 13.2: 5-17. [Special issue on “Industrial Relations Meets Human Geography: Spatialising the Social Relations of Work.”]

2001    Andrew Herod and Melissa W. Wright: “Theorizing space and time.”  Environment and Planning A 33.12: 2089-2093.  (Introduction to special issue on “Theorizing Space and Time”).

2001    Andrew Herod: “Labor internationalism and the contradictions of globalization: Or, why the local is sometimes still important in a global economy.”  Antipode 33.3: 407-426.  [Special issue on “Place, Space and the New Labour Internationalisms.”]

2000    Andrew Herod: “Workers and workplaces in a neoliberal global economy.”  Environment and Planning A 32.10: 1781-1790.

2000    Andrew Herod: “Implications of Just-in-Time production for union strategy: Lessons from the 1998 General Motors-United Auto Workers dispute.”  Annals of the Association of American Geographers 90.3: 521-547.  [Publisher’s erratum for figures published in Annals of the Association of American Geographers (2001) 91.1: 200-202.]

2000    Ben Salt, Ron Cervero, and Andrew Herod: “Workers’ education and neoliberal globalization: An adequate response to transnational corporations?”  Adult Education Quarterly 51.1: 9-31. 

Awarded 2001 American Association for Adult and Continuing Education “Imogene Okes Award” for the best article published in the field of adult and continuing education during 2000.

1999    Andrew Herod: “Using industrial disputes to teach about economic geography.”  Journal of Geography 98.5: 229-241. 

Awarded 2000 National Council for Geographic Education (NCGE) “Journal of Geography Awards Task Force Best Content Award” for the best article published during 1999 in Journal of Geography.

1999    Andrew Herod: “Reflections on interviewing foreign elites: Praxis, positionality, validity, and the cult of the insider.”  Geoforum 30.4: 313-327.  [Special issue on “Networks, Cultures and Elite Research: The Economic Geographer as Situated Researcher.”]

1998    Andrew Herod: “Discourse on the docks: Containerization and inter-union work disputes in US ports, 1955-1985.”  Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, New Series 23.2: 177-191.

1997    Andrew Herod: “Reinterpreting organized labor’s experience in the Southeast: 1947 to present.”  Southeastern Geographer 37.2: 214-237.  [Special issue on “The Changing South, 1947-1997.”]

1997    Andrew Herod: “Labor’s spatial praxis and the geography of contract bargaining in the US east coast longshore industry, 1953-89.”  Political Geography 16.2: 145-169.  [Special issue on “The political geography of scale.”]

1997    Andrew Herod: “From a geography of labor to a labor geography: Labor’s spatial fix and the geography of capitalism.”  Antipode 29.1: 1-31. 

A shortened and edited version was reprinted in John Bryson, Nick Henry, David Keeble, and Ron Martin (eds.) (1999) The Economic Geography Reader: Producing and Consuming Global Capitalism, pp. 380-387.  John Wiley and Sons: Chichester, UK

A version in German was reprinted as “Die Geographie der Arbeiter/innen: Der spatial fix der Arbeitskräfte und die Geographie des Kapitalismus” in Bernd Belina and Boris Michel (eds.) (2007) Raumproduktionen, pp. 173-204.  Westfälisches Dampfboot: Münster.

1995    Andrew Herod: “The practice of international labor solidarity and the geography of the global economy.”  Economic Geography 71.4: 341-363.

1994    Andrew Herod: “On workers’ theoretical (in)visibility in the writing of critical urban geography: A comradely critique.”  Urban Geography 15.7: 681-693.  [Special issue on “Social (In)justice and the City: Twenty Years On.”]

1994    Andrew Herod: “Further reflections on organized labor and deindustrialization in the United States.”  Antipode 26.1: 77-95.

1993    Andrew Herod: “Gender issues in the use of interviewing as a research method.” The Professional Geographer 45.3: 305-317.

1991    Andrew Herod: “Local political practice in response to a manufacturing plant closure: How geography complicates class analysis.” Antipode 23.4: 385-402. 

Listed by the journal’s publisher (January, 2009) as one of the 40-most influential articles published in Antipode between 1969 and 2009.

1991    Andrew Herod: “From rag trade to real estate in New York’s Garment Center: Remaking the labor landscape in a global city.” Urban Geography 12.4: 324-338.

1991    Andrew Herod: “Homework and the fragmentation of space: Challenges for the labor movement.” Geoforum 22.2: 173-183.  [Special issue on “Changing Gender Relations in Urban Space.”]

1991    Andrew Herod: “The production of scale in United States labour relations.” Area 23.1: 82-88.

 

Chapters in Books:

2017    Andrew Herod, Graham Pickren, Al Rainnie, and Susan McGrath-Champ: “Innovation, development and global destruction networks.”  In Harald Bathelt, Patrick Cohendet, Sebastian Henn, and Laurent Simon (eds.), The Elgar Companion to Innovation and Knowledge Creation, pp. 752-770.  Edward Elgar: Cheltenham, UK.

2017    Andrew Herod: “From workers in the city to workers’ cities.”  In Miriam Greenberg and Penny Lewis (eds.), The City is the Factory: New Solidarities and Spatial Strategies in an Urban Age, pp. 197-219.  Cornell University Press: Ithaca, NY.

2015    Andrew Herod: “Die Geographie globaler Productionsnetzwerke und die Handlungsmacht von Lohnabhängigen” [“The geography of Global Production Networks and worker agency.”]  In Sarah Bormann, Jenny Jungehülsing, Shuwen Bian, Martina Hartung, and Florian Schubert (eds.), Last Call for Solidarity: Perspektiven grenzüberschreitenden Handelns von Gewerkschaften [Last Call for Solidarity: Perspectives on Cross-border Action by Trade Unions], pp. 85-104.  VSA Verlag: Hamburg.

2015    Al Rainnie, Andrew Herod, Susan McGrath-Champ, and Graham Pickren: “Wasted commodities, wasted labour?: Global Production and Destruction Networks and the nature of contemporary capitalism.”  In Kirsty Newsome, Phil Taylor, Jennifer Bair, and Al Rainnie, Putting Labour in its Place: Labour Process Analysis and Global Value Chains, pp. 249-265.  Palgrave Macmillan: Basingstoke, UK.

2014    Andrew Herod: “The rational city: Paris.”  In Paul Knox (ed.), Atlas of Cities, pp. 88-105.  Princeton University Press: Princeton. 

This book was awarded the 2014 Association of American Geographers’ “Globe Book Award for Public Understanding of Geography.”

2014    Andrew Herod: “Ports as places of stickiness in a world of global flows.”  In Alexander Reid Ross (ed.), Grabbing Back: Essays Against the Global Land Grab, pp. 267-280.  AK Press: Oakland, CA.

2014    Andrew Herod: “Globalisation: An overview.”  In Vandana Desai and Robert B. Potter (eds.), Companion to Development Studies, 3rd Edition, pp. 161-166.  Hodder Routledge: Abingdon, UK.

2012    Andrew Herod: “Placing labor.”  In Daniel Katz and Richard A. Greenwald (eds.), Labor Rising: The Past and Future of Working People in America, pp. 83-99.  New Press: New York.

2011    Andrew Herod: “Class.”  In John A. Agnew and James S. Duncan (eds.), The Wiley-Blackwell Companion To Human Geography, pp. 415-425.  Wiley-Blackwell: Chichester, UK.

2011    Andrew Herod, Al Rainnie, and Susan McGrath-Champ: “Working space: Why incorporating the geographical is central to theorizing work and employment practices.”  In Marian Baird, Rae Cooper, Bradon Ellem, and Russell Lansbury (eds.), Industrial Relations: Major Works – Volume I, Theories and Approaches, pp. 301-318.  Sage: London. 

Reprinted version of a paper originally appearing as Andrew Herod, Al Rainnie, and Susan McGrath-Champ: “Working space: Why incorporating the geographical is central to theorizing work and employment practices,” Work, Employment and Society 21.2: 247-264, (2007).

2011    Andrew Herod: “Social engineering through spatial engineering: Company towns and the geographical imagination.”  In Oliver J. Dinius and Angela Vergara (eds.), Company Towns in the Americas: Landscape, Power, and Working-Class Communities, pp. 21-44.  University of Georgia Press Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation Series: Athens.

2010    Andrew Herod: “Labor and local and regional development.”  In Andy Pike, Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, and John Tomaney (eds.), Handbook of Local and Regional Development, pp. 119-127.  Routledge: London and New York.

2010    Andrew Herod: “Labour geography: Where have we been, where should we go?”  In Ann Cecilie Bergene, Sylvi B. Endresen, and Hege Merete Knutsen (eds.), Missing Links in Labour Geography, pp. 15-28.  Ashgate: Farnham, UK.

2010    Andrew Herod and Kathleen C. Parker: “Operational decisions.”  In Basil Gomez and John Paul Jones III (eds.), Research Methods in Geography: A Critical Introduction, pp. 60-76.  Wiley-Blackwell: Chichester, UK.

2010    Andrew Herod, Susan McGrath-Champ, and Al Rainnie: “Foundations.”  In Susan McGrath-Champ, Andrew Herod, and Al Rainnie (eds.), Handbook of Employment and Society: Working Space, pp. 1-16.  Edward Elgar: Cheltenham, UK.

2010    Al Rainnie, Susan McGrath-Champ, and Andrew Herod: “Working spaces.”  In Susan McGrath-Champ, Andrew Herod, and Al Rainnie (eds.), Handbook of Employment and Society: Working Space, pp. 61-83.  Edward Elgar: Cheltenham, UK.

2010    Al Rainnie, Andrew Herod, and Susan McGrath-Champ: “Workers in space.”  In Susan McGrath-Champ, Andrew Herod, and Al Rainnie (eds.), Handbook of Employment and Society: Working Space, pp. 249-272.  Edward Elgar: Cheltenham, UK.

2010    Al Rainnie, Susan McGrath-Champ, and Andrew Herod: “Making space for geography in labour process theory.”  In Paul Thompson and Chris Smith (eds.), Working Life: Renewing Labour Process Analysis, pp. 297-315.  Palgrave Macmillan: Basingstoke, UK.

2008    Andrew Herod: “Scale: The local and the global.”  In Sarah Holloway, Stephen Rice, Gill Valentine, and Nick Clifford (eds.), Key Concepts in Geography, 2nd Edition, pp. 217-235.  Sage: London.

Updated and rewritten version of chapter that appeared in the first edition of Sarah Holloway, Stephen Rice, and Gill Valentine [eds.] (2003), Key Concepts in Geography, pp. 229-247, Sage: London.

2008    Noel Castree, David Featherstone, and Andrew Herod: “Contrapuntal geographies: The politics of organizing across sociospatial difference.”  In Kevin R. Cox, Murray Low, and Jennifer Robinson (eds.), The Sage Handbook of Political Geography, pp. 305-321.  Sage: Los Angeles.

2007    Andrew Herod: “The agency of labour in global change: Reimagining the spaces and scales of trade union praxis within a global economy.”  In John M. Hobson and Leonard Seabrooke (eds.), Everyday Politics of the World Economy, pp. 27-44.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

2007    Andrew Herod: “Von der Geographie der Arbeit zur Arbeitsgeographie: Der spatial fix der Arbeit und die Geographie des Kapitalismus.”  In Bernd Belina and Boris Michel (eds.), Raumproduktionen: Beiträge der Radical Geography – Eine Zwischenbilanz, pp. 173-204.  Westfälisches Dampfboot: Münster.

German translation of a paper originally appearing as “From a geography of labor to a labor geography: Labor’s spatial fix and the geography of capitalism,” Antipode 29.1: 1-31, (1997).

2007    Andrew Herod: “The impact of containerization on work on the New York-New Jersey waterfront.”  In William G. Moseley, David A. Lanegran, and Kavita Pandit (eds.), The Introductory Reader in Human Geography: Contemporary Debates and Classic Writings, pp. 306-309.  Blackwell: Oxford.

Shortened, edited, and reprinted version of a paper originally appearing as “The impact of containerization on work on the New York-New Jersey waterfront,” Social Science Docket, 4.1: 5-7, (2004).

2007    Andrew Herod: “Labour organizing in the New Economy: Examples from the USA and beyond.”  In Peter Daniels, Andrew Leyshon, Mike Bradshaw, and Jonathan Beaverstock (eds.), Geographies of the New Economy: Critical Reflections, pp. 132-150.  Routledge: London.

2006    Andrew Herod and Luis L.M. Aguiar: “Cleaners and the dirty work of neoliberalism  In Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod (eds.), The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy, pp. 1-10.  Blackwell: Oxford.

Published simultaneously in Antipode 38.3: 425-434 as part of special issue on “The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy,” Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod [eds.] (2006).

2006    Andrew Herod and Luis L.M. Aguiar: “Section I Introduction: Geographies of neoliberalism”  In Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod (eds.), The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy, pp. 11-15.  Blackwell: Oxford.

Published simultaneously in Antipode 38.3: 435-439 as part of special issue on “The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy,” Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod [eds.] (2006).

2006    Shaun Ryan and Andrew Herod: “Restructuring the architecture of state regulation in the Australian and Aotearoa/ New Zealand cleaning industries and the growth of precarious employment.”  In Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod (eds.), The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy, pp. 60-80.  Blackwell: Oxford.

Published simultaneously in Antipode 38.3: 486-507 as part of special issue on “The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy,” Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod [eds.] (2006).

2006    Andrew Herod and Luis L.M. Aguiar: “Section II Introduction: Ethnographies of the cleaning body”  In Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod (eds.), The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy, pp. 102-105.  Blackwell: Oxford.

Published simultaneously in Antipode 38.3: 530-533 as part of special issue on “The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy,” Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod [eds.] (2006).

2006    Karen Søgaard, Anne Katrine Blangsted, Andrew Herod, and Lotte Finsen: “Work design and the labouring body: Examining the impacts of work organisation on Danish cleaners’ health.”  In Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod (eds.), The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy, pp. 150-171.  Blackwell: Oxford.

Published simultaneously in Antipode 38.3: 579-602 as part of special issue on “The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy,” Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod [eds.] (2006).

2006    Andrew Herod and Luis L.M. Aguiar: “Section III Introduction: Cleaners’ agency”  In Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod (eds.), The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy, pp. 172-176.  Blackwell: Oxford.

Published simultaneously in Antipode 38.3: 603-607 as part of special issue on “The Dirty Work of Neoliberalism: Cleaners in the Global Economy,” Luis L.M. Aguiar and Andrew Herod [eds.] (2006).

2006    Andrew Herod: “Trotsky’s omission: Labour’s role in combined and uneven development.”  In Bill Dunn and Hugo Radice (eds.), 100 Years of Permanent Revolution: Results and Prospects, pp. 152-165.  Pluto: London.

2004    Andrew Herod: “Impacts of the transition on unions in Eastern Europe.”  In Berthold Unfried and Marcel van der Linden (eds.), Labour and New Social Movements in a Globalising World/ Arbeit, Arbeiterbewegung und neue soziale Bewegungen im globalisierten Weltsystem, pp. 139-154.  Internationale Tagung der Historikerinnen und Historiker der Arbeiter und anderer Sozialer Bewegungen, Tagungsberichte 38: Leipzig.

2003    Scott Salmon and Andrew Herod: “Socialist geography.”  In Gary L. Gaile and Cort J. Willmott (eds.), Geography in America at the Dawn of the 21st Century, pp. 209-220.  Oxford University Press: Oxford.

2003    Andrew Herod: “Scale: The local and the global.”  In Sarah Holloway, Stephen Rice, and Gill Valentine (eds.), Key Concepts in Geography, pp. 229-247.  Sage: London.

2003    Andrew Herod, Jamie Peck, and Jane Wills: “Geography and industrial relations.”  In Peter Ackers and Adrian Wilkinson (eds.), Understanding Work and Employment: Industrial Relations in Transition, pp. 176-192.  Oxford University Press: Oxford.

2002    Andrew Herod: “Global change in the world of organized labor.”  In Ron J. Johnston, Peter J. Taylor, and Michael J. Watts (eds.), Geographies of Global Change: Remapping the World (2nd Edition), pp. 78-87.  Blackwell: Oxford.

2002    Andrew Herod and Melissa W. Wright: “Placing scale: An introduction.”  In Andrew Herod and Melissa W. Wright (eds.), Geographies of Power: Placing Scale, pp. 1-14.  Blackwell: Oxford.

2002    Andrew Herod and Melissa W. Wright: “Introduction: Theorizing scale.”  In Andrew Herod and Melissa W. Wright (eds.), Geographies of Power: Placing Scale, pp. 17-24.  Blackwell: Oxford.

2002    Andrew Herod and Melissa W. Wright: “Introduction: Rhetorics of scale.”  In Andrew Herod and Melissa W. Wright (eds.), Geographies of Power: Placing Scale, pp. 147-153.  Blackwell: Oxford.

2002    Andrew Herod and Melissa W. Wright: “Introduction: Scales of praxis.”  In Andrew Herod and Melissa W. Wright (eds.), Geographies of Power: Placing Scale, pp. 217-223.  Blackwell: Oxford.

2002    Andrew Herod: “Organizing globally, organizing locally: Union spatial strategy in a global economy.”  In Jeffery Harrod and Robert O’Brien (eds.), Global Unions?: Theory and Strategies of Organized Labour in the Global Political Economy, pp. 83-99.  Routledge: London (Review of International Political Economy Series in Global Political Economy).

2001    Andrew Herod: “Labor internationalism and the contradictions of globalization: Or, why the local is sometimes still important in a global economy.”  In Jane Wills and Peter Waterman (eds.), Place, Space and the New Labour Internationalisms, pp. 103-122.  Blackwell: Oxford.

2000    Andrew Herod: “Labor unions and economic geography.”  In Eric Sheppard and Trevor Barnes (eds.), A Companion to Economic Geography, pp. 341-358.  Blackwell: Oxford.

1999    Andrew Herod: “From a geography of labor to a labor geography: Labor’s spatial fix and the geography of capitalism.”  In John Bryson, Nick Henry, David Keeble, and Ron Martin (eds.), The Economic Geography Reader: Producing and Consuming Global Capitalism, pp. 380-387.  John Wiley and Sons: Chichester, UK.

Shortened, edited, and reprinted version of a paper originally appearing as “From a geography of labor to a labor geography: Labor’s spatial fix and the geography of capitalism,” Antipode 29.1: 1-31 (1997).

1998    Andrew Herod: “The spatiality of labor unionism: A review essay.”  In Andrew Herod (ed.), Organizing the Landscape: Geographical Perspectives on Labor Unionism, pp. 1-36.  University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis and London.

1998    Andrew Herod: “Increasing the scale of things: Labor’s transnational spatial strategies and the geography of capitalism.”  In Andrew Herod (ed.), Organizing the Landscape: Geographical Perspectives on Labor Unionism, pp. 39-44.  University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis and London.

1998    Andrew Herod: “The geostrategics of labor in post-Cold War Eastern Europe: An examination of the activities of the International Metalworkers’ Federation.”  In Andrew Herod (ed.), Organizing the Landscape: Geographical Perspectives on Labor Unionism, pp. 45-74.  University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis and London.

1998    Andrew Herod: “Geographic mobility, place, and cultures of labor unionism.”  In Andrew Herod (ed.), Organizing the Landscape: Geographical Perspectives on Labor Unionism, pp. 123-128.  University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis and London.

1998    Andrew Herod: “Political geographies of labor union organizing.”  In Andrew Herod (ed.), Organizing the Landscape: Geographical Perspectives on Labor Unionism, pp. 197-201.  University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis and London.

1998    Andrew Herod: “Labor unions and the making of economic geographies.”  In Andrew Herod (ed.), Organizing the Landscape: Geographical Perspectives on Labor Unionism, pp. 255-262.  University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis and London.

1998    Andrew Herod: “Theorising trade unions in transition.”  In John Pickles and Adrian Smith (eds.), Theorising Transition: The Political Economy of Post-Communist Transformations, pp. 197-217.  Routledge: London and New York.

1998    Gearóid Ó Tuathail, Andrew Herod, and Susan Roberts: “Negotiating unruly problematics.”  In Andrew Herod, Gearóid Ó Tuathail, and Susan Roberts (eds.), An Unruly World? Globalization, Governance and Geography, pp. 1-24.  Routledge: London and New York.

1998    Andrew Herod: “Of blocs, flows and networks: The end of the Cold War, cyberspace, and the geo-economics of organized labor at the fin de millénaire.”  In Andrew Herod, Gearóid Ó Tuathail, and Susan Roberts (eds.), An Unruly World? Globalization, Governance and Geography, pp. 162-195.  Routledge: London and New York.

1997    Andrew Herod: “Notes on a spatialized labour politics: Scale and the political geography of dual unionism in the US longshore industry.”  In Roger Lee and Jane Wills (eds.), Geographies of Economies, pp. 186-196. Edward Arnold: London, New York, Sydney, and Auckland.

1997    Andrew Herod: “Back to the future in labor relations: From the New Deal to Newt’s Deal.”  In Lynn Staeheli, Janet Kodras, and Colin Flint (eds.), State Devolution in America: Implications for a Diverse Society, pp. 161-180.  Sage (Urban Affairs Annual Reviews No. 48): Thousand Oaks, CA, London, and New Delhi.

1997    Andrew Herod: “Labor as an agent of globalization and as a global agent.”  In Kevin R. Cox (ed.), Spaces of Globalization: Reasserting the Power of the Local, pp. 167-200.  Guilford: New York and London.

 

On-Line Resources:

2014    Andrew Herod: “Geography of Labor.”  In Barney Warf, (ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Geography (online resource available at: www.oxfordbibliographies.com [DOI: 10.1093/OBO/9780199874002-0102]).  Oxford University Press: New York.

 

Encyclopædia Entries:

2017    Andrew Herod: “Labor geographies and the corporation.”  In Noel Castree, Michael Goodchild, Weidong Liu, Audrey Kobayashi, Richard Marston, and Douglas Richardson (editor in chief ) (eds.), The International Encyclopedia of Geography: People, the Earth, Environment, and Technology, pp. 3895-3900.  Wiley-Blackwell: Chichester, UK.

2012    Andrew Herod: “Labor, geography of.”  In Larry J. Griffin and Peggy G. Hargis (eds.), The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture (Volume 20: Social Class), Second Edition, pp. 146-152.  University of Mississippi Press: Oxford, MS.

2012    Andrew Herod: “Scales of globalization.”  In George Ritzer (ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Globalization, 1825-1826.  Wiley-Blackwell: Chichester, UK.

2012    Andrew Herod: “Geography of globalization.”  In George Ritzer (ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Globalization, pp. 797-800.  Wiley-Blackwell: Chichester, UK.

2012    Andrew Herod: “Division of labor.”  In George Ritzer (ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Globalization, pp. 453-455.  Wiley-Blackwell: Chichester, UK.

2009    Andrew Herod: “Labor unionism.”  In Rob Kitchin and Nigel Thrift (eds.), International Encyclopedia of Human Geography, Volume 6, pp. 91-96.  Elsevier: Oxford.

2006    Andrew Herod: “Class.”  In Barney Warf (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Geography, pp. 42-43.  Sage: Thousand Oaks, CA.

2006    Andrew Herod: “Class war.”  In Barney Warf (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Geography, pp. 43-44.  Sage: Thousand Oaks, CA.

2006    Andrew Herod: “Domestic sphere.”  In Barney Warf (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Geography, pp. 114-116.  Sage: Thousand Oaks, CA.

2006    Andrew Herod: “Labor, geography of.”  In Barney Warf (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Geography, pp. 267-268.  Sage: Thousand Oaks, CA.

2006    Andrew Herod: “Marxism, geography and.”  In Barney Warf (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Geography, pp. 293-296.  Sage: Thousand Oaks, CA.

2005    Andrew Herod: “Tonga.”  In C. Neal Tate (editor in chief), Governments of the World: A Global Guide to Citizens’ Rights and Responsibilities – Volume 4: Popular Sovereignty to Zimbabwe, pp. 187-188.  Thompson Gale: Farmington Hills, MI.

 

Book Reviews:

2016    Introducing Globalization: Ties, Tensions, and Uneven Integration by Matthew Sparke (2013) [Wiley-Blackwell: Chichester, UK] in AAG Review of Books 4.3: 145-147.

2011    Labour, Globalization and the State: Workers, Women and Migrants Confront Neoliberalism by Debdas Banerjee and Michael Goldfield (eds.) (2007) [Routledge Contemporary South Asia: London] in Labor History 52.3: 356-358.

2011    Working Bodies: Interactive Service Employment and Workplace Identities by Linda McDowell (2009) [Wiley-Blackwell: Chichester, UK] in Social & Cultural Geography 12.2: 204-205.

2011    Getting the Goods: Ports, Labor, and the Logistics Revolution by Edna Bonacich and Jake B. Wilson (2008) [Cornell University Press: Ithaca, NY] in Antipode 43.2: 599-600.

2010    Our Daily Bread: Wages, Workers and the Political Economy of the American West by Geoff Mann (2007) [University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill, NC] in Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 28.6: 1124-1126.

2008    Spaces of Global Capitalism: Towards A Theory of Uneven Geographical Development by David Harvey (2006) [Verso: London] in Labour/ Le Travail 61: 317-319.

2006    Globalization and Social Exclusion: A Transformation Perspective by Ronaldo Munck (2005) [Kumarian Press: Bloomfield, CT] in Labor History 47.4: 592-593.

2006    The American South in a Global World by James L. Peacock, Harry L. Watson, and Carrie R. Matthews (eds.) (2005) [University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill] in Southeastern Geographer 46.2: 342-344.

2005    American Empire: America’s Geographer and the Prelude to Globalization by Neil Smith (2003) [University of California Press: Berkeley] in Area 37.4: 457-458.

2005    Spaces of Work: Global Capitalism and Geographies of Labour by Noel Castree, Neil M. Coe, Kevin Ward, and Michael Samers (2004) [Sage: London] in Environment and Planning A 37.4: 751-752.

2004    Dialectical Urbanism: Social Struggles in the Capitalist City by Andrew Merrifield (2002) [Monthly Review Press: New York] in Labour/ Le Travail 53: 354-356.

2003    Pension Fund Capitalism by Gordon L. Clark (2000) [Oxford University Press: New York] in Annals of the Association of American Geographers 93.1: 252-255.

2002    Spaces of Hope by David Harvey (2000) [University of California Press: Berkeley] in Urban Geography 23.5: 495-496.

2001    California and the Fictions of Capital  by George L. Henderson (1999) [Oxford University Press: New York] in Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 19.3, 372-374.

1999    Women and Work in Mexico’s Maquiladoras by Altha J. Cravey (1998) [Rowman and Littlefield: Lanham, MD] in Annals of the Association of American Geographers 89.4, 785-787.

1998    Union Retreat and the Regions: The Shrinking Landscape of Organised Labour  by Ron Martin, Peter Sunley, and Jane Wills (1996) [Jessica Kingsley: London] in Economic Geography 74.1, 75-77.

1997    Work-Place: The Social Regulation of Labor Markets by Jamie Peck (1996) [Guilford: New York and London] in Annals of the Association of American Geographers 87.4, 746-748.

1996    Marxism in the Postmodern Age: Confronting the New World Order by Antonio Callari, Stephen Cullenberg, and Carole Biewener, editors, (1995) [Guilford: New York and London] in Growth and Change Winter, 125-129.

1995    Militancy, Market Dynamics, and Workplace Authority: The Struggle over Labor Process in the U.S. Automobile Industry, 1946 to 1973 by James R. Zetka, Jr., (1995) [State University of New York Press: Albany] in Social Science Quarterly 76.4, 922-924.

1994    The Restless Urban Landscape by Paul L. Knox, editor, (1993) [Prentice Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ] in The Professional Geographer 46.3, 395-396.

1994    Geographical Inquiry and American Historical Problems by Carville Earle (1992) [Stanford University Press: Stanford, CA] in Annals of the Association of American Geographers 84.2, 320-323.

1994    Retraining – Not Redundancy: Innovative Approaches to Industrial Restructuring in Germany and France by Gerhard Bosch (1992) [International Institute for Labour Studies: Geneva] in Progress in Human Geography 18.1, 102-103.

 

Papers in Refereed Conference Proceedings:

2015    Andrew Herod, Graham Pickren, Al Rainnie, and Susan McGrath-Champ: “Waste recycling as a source of raw materials for new products – Exploring the concept of Global Destruction Networks.”  In Conference Proceedings of the ISSSM (International Symposium on Social Sciences and Management) and ICEEPS (International Conference on Education, Psychology and Society) Meeting.  Tokyo, Japan, February 4-5 (pp. 535-552).

2010    Susan McGrath-Champ, Al Rainnie, and Andrew Herod: “Progressing work: How spatial approaches change our theories of work and labour.”  In Alison Barnes, Nikola Balnave, and George Lafferty (eds.) Work in Progress: Crises, Choices and Continuity: Proceedings of the 24th Conference Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand.  Sydney, Australia (12 pp.).

2001    Andrew Herod: “El internacionalismo obrero y las contradicciones de la globalización: O, ¿Por qué en ocasiones los asuntos locales resultan importantes en una economía global?”  In Luis H. Serrano Perez (ed.) Memorias del 4 Taller Cientifico 1 de Mayo.  Institutio de Historia de Cuba: Havana (12 pp.).

1995    “Trade unionism and the transition to the market economy in Eastern and Central Europe.”  Proceedings of the Regional Conference of the International Geographical Union on “Latin America in the World: Environment, Society and Development.”  Havana, Cuba (15 pp.).

1994    “International labor organizing in the post-Cold War era.” Proceedings of the Regional Conference of the International Geographical Union on “Environment and Quality of Life in Central Europe: Problems of Transition.”  Prague, Czech Republic (15 pp.).

1991    “Restructuring the waterfront and the geographical practice of the International Longshoremen’s Association.” Proceedings of the Middle States Division of the Association of American Geographers, 1991, 51-57.

 

Forewords:

2015    Foreword for Ann El Khoury (2015) Globalization, Development, and Social Justice: A Propositional Political Approach, pp. xv-xvii.  Routledge (Rethinking Globalizations Book Series): Abingdon, UK.

 

Commentaries on Book Jackets:

2015    Out of Sight: The Long and Disturbing Story of Corporations Outsourcing Catastrophe by Erik Loomis.  The New Press: New York.

2005    Globalization and Cross-Border Labor Solidarity in the Americas: The Anti-Sweatshop Movement and the Struggle for Social Justice by Ralph Armbruster-Sandoval.  Routledge: New York.

2002    On the Fault Line: Race, Class, and the American Patriot Movement by Carolyn Gallaher.  Rowman and Littlefield: Lanham, MD.